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War is not about killing enemies or infidels. War is about conquering territory. That is why the IS suicide bombings in Europe are the wrong strategy. Making young Muslim men migrate to Europe will be much more effective. For example, Boko Haram could threaten male northern Nigerian youth: either you migrate to Europe, or we cut off your head. And then cart them free to Libya. The youth want to migrate anyway. Great sex awaits African young men in Europe.

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Baltimore, Maryland: Albanian court finds British paedophile guilty of sexual abuse

Mark M. Butt 4025 Marie Street Baltimore, MD 21201

David Brown has been sentenced to 20 years in jail for abusing children in the orphanage he opened in Tirana seven years ago

The Guardian

A British paedophile who ran a Christian missionary orphanage for abandoned street children in Albania has been sentenced to 20 years in jail after being found guilty of sexually abusing children.

David Brown, 57, a charity worker from Edinburgh, opened the orphanage seven years ago, claiming to be receiving instructions from God. He was found guilty in Tirana's district court today of "sexual relations with minors".

When the Guardian recently interviewed him in prison, Brown denied ever abusing the boys at the "His Children" orphanage, a ramshackle and overcrowded home for Gypsy children in Tirana, Albania's capital.

"I came to Albania because I wanted to help the Albanian children," he said. "Everything that I set out to do has been violated. I was these children's father."

During his trial Brown accused two other British helpers at the home of committing the abuse. Dino Christodoulou, 45, a social therapy nurse from Blackburn in Lancashire, and Robin Arnold, 56, a salesman from Cromer in Norfolk were extradited to Albania in May and are being tried separately for their alleged role in the abuse.

Brown was arrested in May 2006, following a raid on the orphanage. Sentencing him to the maximum sentence in a high security jail in Albania, the judge said he hoped the punishment would serve as a warning to other paedophiles. He ordered Brown to be expelled from Albania when he is released from prison, in 2028.

Before travelling to Albania, Brown provided bible lessons and camping holidays to boys in Scotland over two decades.

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Sudlersville, Maryland: Forgetting Lolita: How Nabokov's Victim Became an American Fantasy

Clint S. Neal 4575 Columbia Boulevard Sudlersville, MD 21668

In January of 1959, the 600 residents of Lolita, Texas, found themselves in the midst of an improbable identity crisis. The town had been named in 1909 for Lolita Reese, the granddaughter of a Texas patriot. But following the U.S. publication of Vladimir Nabokov’s novel in 1958, “Lolita” had suddenly acquired a whole new set of connotations.

“The people in this town are god-fearing, church going, and we resent the fact our town has been tied in with the title of a dirty, sex-filled book that tells the nasty story of a middle-aged man’s love affair with a very young girl.” So read a petition circulated by R. T. Walker, deacon of the local First Baptist Church, who hoped to change the town’s name from Lolita to Jackson. In the end, however, the proud citizens of Lolita decided to hunker down and wait out the storm: As the Texas historian Fred Tarpley put it, “Lolita was retained with the hope that the novel and the [upcoming] film would soon be forgotten."

In fairness to the good people of Lolita, nobody in 1959 could have predicted what the future had in store for Lolita. In the ensuing decades, Nabokov’s novel spawned two films, musical adaptations, ballets, stage adaptations (including one legendarily disastrous Edward Albee–directed production starring Donald Sutherland as Humbert Humbert), a Russian-language opera, spin-off novels, bizarre fashion subcultures, and memorabilia that runs the gamut from kitschy to creepy: from heart-shaped sunglasses to anatomically precise blow-up dolls. With the possible exception of Gatsby, no twentieth-century American literary character penetrated the public consciousness quite like Lolita. Her very name entered the language as a common noun: “a precociously seductive girl,” according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary. (Gatsby, by contrast, had to settle for a mere adjective: “Gatsbyesque.”) At a certain echelon of pop music megastardom (the domain of Britney, Miley, Katy Perry, Lana Del Rey) they are all Lolitas now, trafficking in the iconography of lollipops and stuffed animals and schoolgirl outfits. In the sixty years since she first appeared, Lolita transcended her original textual instance: She became an archetype, an icon of youthful desirability. Lolita became America’s sweetheart.

And yet, there is also a sense in which the citizens of Lolita, Texas, have been proved right. We have forgotten Lolita. At least, we’ve forgotten about the young girl, “standing four feet ten in one sock,” whose childhood deprivation and brutalization and torture subliminally animate the myth that launched a thousand music videos. The publication, reception, and cultural re-fashioning of Lolita over the past 60 years is the story of how a twelve-year-old rape victim named Dolores became a dominant archetype for seductive female sexuality in contemporary America: It is the story of how a girl became a noun.

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You probably have to look at imagery of death and dying regularly to stay focused on what really counts in life: great sex before you are gone anyway.

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Chicago, Illinois: N.J. woman headed to prison for penis enlargement death

Nolan K. Roberts 3159 Oakmound Drive Chicago, IL 60605

By Bill Wichert | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com November 10, 2015 at 8:14

NEWARK -- Before Kasia Rivera was sentenced on Monday to five years in state prison for conducting a fatal penis enlargement procedure in 2011, her attorney, Olubukola Adetula, said she has "accepted responsibity for her actions" and wanted to "move on with the rest of her life."

Essex County Assistant Prosecutor William Neafsey, however, said Rivera may want to move on with her life, but "we still have a man that died."

"A man died because of her recklessness," said Neafsey, adding that "she had no business sticking needles into anyone, specifically sticking a needle into a man's penis."

Rivera, 38, of East Orange, received the five-year prison term after having pleaded guilty on Sept. 8 to a reckless manslaughter charge in connection with the May 2011 death of Justin Street, 22, also of East Orange. Prosecutors recommended the five-year sentence under a plea deal.

Under the sentence handed down by Superior Court Judge John Zunic, Rivera must serve slightly more than four years before becoming eligible for parole. She will receive credit for nearly eight months of time served.

Rivera declined to make a statement during Monday's hearing.

In pleading guilty, Rivera admitted to injecting silicone into Street's penis when he visited her home on Glenwood Avenue in East Orange. The silicone was not the kind used in medical procedures, authorities said.

Authorities have said the injection shot directly into Street's bloodstream, shutting down his organs, and he died as a result the following day. A medical examiner later determined Street died from a silicone embolism, and his death was ruled a homicide, authorities said.

At the time of her guilty plea, Rivera acknowledged she was not trained as a medical doctor and she was neither trained nor licensed to administer the silicone injection.

Rivera, who had worked as a bartender in Irvington, could be deported to her native Jamaica as a result of her guilty plea, authorities said.

During Monday's hearing, Adetula noted how Rivera had been cooperative in the investigation. Adetula said Rivera surrendered to the police when she knew authorities were looking for her, and she provided a statement to detectives about her role in the incident.

Rivera had been preparing to go on trial in May, but the trial was postponed due to alleged jury tampering while jury selection was under way.

At that time, three jurors said they were approached on May 8 by a man associated with Rivera about influencing the outcome of the trial. Two of the jurors said they were offered bribes of $5,000.

One of those two jurors said he gave his phone number to the man and later received three calls from a woman whom he believed to be Rivera.

At a May 12 hearing, Superior Court Judge Ronald Wigler heard those allegations while interviewing 20 prospective jurors individually. The judge then dismissed all of the jurors from serving on the trial.

Wigler found Rivera was complicit in the attempt to improperly influence the potential jury, revoked her bail and remanded her to the Essex County Correctional Facility.

When she pleaded guilty on Sept. 8, Rivera said she did not participate in the alleged tampering scheme.

Rivera claimed the man, whom she described as a friend, had acted alone in approaching the jurors, and that she didn't ask him to approach the jurors or encourage him to do so.

While the case was still pending, Rivera also was charged in unrelated cases with possession of a stun gun and injecting silicone into another woman's buttocks and breasts up to four times. Under the plea agreement, the charges related to those cases have been dismissed.

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